Saturday, December 13, 2014

Gone Girl (2014)

Director: David Fincher
Writer:    Gillian Flynn
Cast:       Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Kim Dickens


With his wife's (Rosamund Pike) disappearance having become the focus of an intense media circus, a man (Ben Affleck) sees the spotlight turned on him when it's suspected that he may not be innocent. It doesn't help him the fact that their marriage was in doldrums and he is kind of not unhappy with his wife gone.

Film is an adaptation of Gillian Flynn's novel of the same name and she herself wrote the screenplay for the film. Ben Affleck seems to be a hate target these days with him being cast as Batman (I couldn't care less about that) and that would have helped this film since his smugness causes hatred towards him from the media circus who judge him based on his appearance. I had an inkling about the twist which comes half way through the film based on things people posted on FB and all that. So I am not sure whether we were supposed to suspect Ben Affleck's character during the first half but I didn't anyway. It is a very entertaining watch with several twists and turns thrown in with plenty of black humor but I don't think it will be one for repeat viewing. The whole thing about anniversary present with clues and an associated treasure hunt might have been alright in the novel but in the film it looks very silly. The husband and wife are supposed to be some sort of intellectuals with a background in writing and that part is also not very convincing in the film. Still it is a very entertaining watch with a very perverse ending where both of them kind of agree to profit from all the shenanigans. 

It is what you expect from David Fincher these days- a slick one where he adapts things that should be very challenging to edit together with coherence (Zodiac, Social Network). Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nails) was involved with the soundtrack. Rosamund Pike is getting some high profile roles these days (Jack Reacher) and she was also involved in Edgar Wright's 'World's End'.

Rating: 3.5/5